Ford's Produce Supply Update

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Washington apple growers are advising that there are approximately 40% fewer grannies on hand compared to the last 2 years.

There are spotty supplies on many varieties which will continue through the summer months.

March’s late freeze really did a number on many peach and blueberry farmers in the southeast.

We’re making the seasonal transition from Chilean grapes to California fruit, and quality has really improved with the switch.

Florida and Mexican vegetable fields have basically finished for the season, and the harvest is moving north for many items.

Corn is reaching peak production in Florida.  Quality doesn’t get much better.

Strong lettuce supplies persist this week as most growers are slightly ahead of their respective planting schedules.

Local News….

Local strawberries and blueberries are still going strong, and we’ll feature them as long as we can.

We’re got the first local tomatoes of the year last week!  Beautiful!

Plentiful supplies of local cabbage.

Squash and zucchini are coming into strong volume.

Cucumbers should start this coming week.

Q:  Why do you never see elephants hiding in trees?

Q:  What’s red and smells like blue paint? 

FDA Food Safety Alerts & Recalls

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Ford's Produce Fruit Ripening Guide

Fruits that Ripen After Harvest
Fruits that Don't Ripen After Harvest
Apricots Nectarines Apples Limes
Avocado Papaya Berries Mandarins
Bananas Peaches Cherries Oranges
Cantaloupe Pears Grapefruit Pineapple
Carambola Plantains Grapes Strawberry
Honeydew Plums Lemons Watermelon
Kiwifruit Tomatoes

Ethylene Gas:  Benefits and effects to produceFords Produce Bananas
Ethylene is one of the most active plant hormones known.  Fruit can be ripened quickly by introducing ethylene gas into a controlled environment.  For example, it is often used to ripen bananas, tomatoes, and avocados.  By placing peaches in a closed bag, you’re taking advantage of the fruits natural ethylene to speed softening.

While ethylene is great for ripening some fruits, the gas can cause premature decay of other fruits and vegetables that are sensitive to it.  To avoid deterioration or rapid ripening of sensitive foods, you should avoid storing them too close together with products that emit a great deal of ethylene gas.  Damaged or older fruits generate increased levels of ethylene, so remove injured produce right away.  If you only have one cooler, keep lids on storage boxes, store sensitive items as far away as possible from ethylene producers, and rotate product properly.  If your inventory turns quickly, ethylene should not cause quality problems.

Fruits that produce high amounts of Ethylene
Apples Kiwifruit
Apricots Mangos
Avocados Papayas
Bananas Peaches
Cantaloupe Pears
Honeydew Plums
Fruits that are sensitive to Ethylene
Beans Greens
Broccoli Lettuces
Brussel Sprouts Okra
Cabbage Peas
Cauliflower Peppers
Cucumbers Spinach
Eggplant Squash

 

We look forward to serving you!